Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Interview with Stina Lindenblatt during the Release of "Heat It Up by"





 Heat It Up by
Some games are hotter off the ice…

Sofia Phillips feels cursed. Her father cheated on her mother, her boyfriend cheated on her—she’s done with dating. A summer work-exchange program in Finland is the perfect escape. But instead of gaining experience as an athletic trainer, she’s cleaning toilets. Awesome. The trip is a disaster, and even better, she meets Kyle Bennett. In the sauna. Naked.

Sexy hockey player Kyle was the star right wing for an NHL team. But after an accident killed his wife and left him injured, Kyle has appreciated the “therapeutic” benefits of booze and puck bunnies. Now in Finland for the summer, he’s coaching in an elite hockey-training camp for teens. When Sofia's grandmother decides to set her up with a nice Finnish man, Sofia recruits Kyle as her make-believe boyfriend. Neither expects their first kiss to sizzle. And neither expects, while stranded on an island during a storm, to have a scorching night of passion.

But as their charade, and then their attraction, develops into something deeper, the past comes back, threatening to destroy them. They must decide if their feelings for each other are strong enough to survive—or it will be game over.






What made you start writing books? 

Ever since I was nine years old and became addicted to the Famous Five series (Edith Blyton), I’ve wanted to be an author. But it wasn’t until I became a stay-at-home mom that I finally went for the goal of becoming published. I used to want to write historical romance (even though I sucked at social studies and history), but I knew I wouldn’t be able to write in that style. At that point, the early Harry Potter books had gained popularity and I tried to write a middle grade book. Except my characters were more interested in romance and sex than they should have been for that age. So I switched the book to YA…and eventually I went on to write adult romances. 

How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned? 

I think there’s a little bit if me in all of my main characters, but it’s a different piece of me each time. Usually it’s not planned; it just happens that way. 

What author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over? 

I’ve been fangirling over Jill Shalvis lately. I love her books. They’ve become my latest obsession.
As for actor, Sam Heughan. I mean, have you seen him in a kilt?

What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain why! 

Horror. I would love to be able to write it, but not everyone can write like Stephen King, Dean Koontz, or John Saul. It takes skill to scare readers. 

What is the most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan? 

One of my fans brought a delicious cupcake to the Romantic Times Convention last year and surprised me with it. It made my month (and the acknowledgement of This One Moment). 

In your opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have? 

Characters you can fall in love with—or at least love to hate. 

What is the most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and after-publication-process)? 

Definitely promotion. I love coming up with the teasers and being creative when it comes to swag, but beyond that, I quickly grow bored of it. But how about we don’t tell my old manager that from when I used to be a pharmaceutical sales rep. lol
The other tough part is balancing my writing with my family. I’m a full time writer, but I don’t get eight hours a day to just write due to family obligations. 

If you had the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that question? 

The hardest questions I’ve been asked that often make me cringe are the ones about my favorite characters that I’ve written. That’s like asking a mother which of her kids is her favorite.
I would love to be asked about my top writing influences. For that I would say Kylie Scott, Jill Shalvis, Colleen Hoover (among many others). Each has an element about her writing that appeals to me, be it emotion, sexiness, humor. 

Which of your characters seems to be the most independent, and has taken on a life of their own? 

I would say all of them, but probably more so Mason Dell from the Pushing Limits series. While working on the second book of the series (My Song For You), his personality took a life of its own. Fortunately for him he gets his own book (I Need You Tonight), which releases May 2017. 

What do you want tell your readers at the end of this interview? 

Don’t ever let anyone tell you that you’ll never succeed at whatever you want to achieve. My high school guidance councelor told me not to think about university because I would never succeed there. I went on to prove him wrong. I have a Masters of Science in exercise physiology. The ultimate revenge. LOL It’s why I have ‘believe’ tattooed on my wrist. 

Thank you, Jeri, for having me here on your blog!

Monday, April 25, 2016

Interview with Kaylee Song during the Release of "Still Here "










Kaylee Song is from rural Pennsylvania. She lived in Pennsylvania, Georgia and DC, and is now moving back to Pennsylvania. She is married and has a dog and cat. She loves reading anything that has a romantic plot and just cannot get enough to read. She is fast approaching thirty and happy as a clam with her life.  She has an amazing husband who is very supportive and they plan to travel the world together.














What is the first book you read that comes to mindWhy is it so important to you?

It's this  book that I read as a teen that I stole from my mom's library pile. I loooved it. And I should not have read it. But ever since I read itI knew that I wanted to be a romance writer. I believe it was called To Love a Man by Karen Robards. http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00K0JFG4Q/

What made you start writing books? 

I've always wanted to write. When I was a teen I wrote fanfiction (Nsync, shhh it is my secret!). 

How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your storiesIs the influence based on a conscious decisionor do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned? 

I'm always writing about myself. Every female character has a little bit of me. Hell, every male character has a little bit of me too. :D It's not always conscious but I know that I do it.  What author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over 

Author -  Amanda Quick.


Musician - Justin Timberlake (see above, lol).
What does your perfect writing day look like?
Do you plan when and how long you writeor does it happen without planning?

I'm up but in chair by 6 am and I write until noon, then lunch then I write until my husband gets home.  In my ideal world I think stop and have family time. In reality I usually work into the night. :P

What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in itExplain why! 

I'm not sure, quite honestly. They are all somewhat intimidating. I try very hard just to keep my head down and write and not get worried.

What do you like to do when you are not writingWhat do you think your profession would be if you were not an author? .  .

I like to do a lot of things. Swim, hike, play DnD, hang out with my friends. If I was not a writer I would probably go back to teaching. I taught at a community college.

What is the most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan? 
 
Gosh there are so many. Anytime someone ims me I am touched. I am also just so privileged to hear about their lives, you know?

Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different from other authors 

I write characters like I know them. Because I do. I am sure other very good authors write that too, but to me that is what makes me stand out.

I write settings that I know. I go there, I feel the earth. I know the landscape. I don't just google.

I don't just write stories I want to read. I listen to my fans, get to know them, listen to their lives and then I write stories I know they want to read too.

I bet all of these things apply to really good authors, but I also think they make me different because I think I interpret it differently. Which of your . characters seems to be the most independentand has taken on a life of their own? 

Wrath. He is my favorite. My baby character. I've wanted to write him for years. Even since I was in high school and one of my friends came back from Iraq without his arm. I knew I wanted to share the story of a military veteran and amputee. Oh, and that guy was one of my first crushes in high school. LOL. 

What do you want tell your readers at the end of this interview? 

Thank you so much for reading. You can email me, im me, facebook friend me, whatever you want. I'm happy to get to know each and every one of you. Thank you so much.




Monday, April 4, 2016

Interview with Theresa Rizzo during the Release of "Silent Sentry"






Author Bio: Theresa Rizzo is an award-winning author who writes romantic crime fiction and emotional stories that explore the complexity of relationships and families through real-life trials. 
Born and raised in Grosse Pointe, Michigan, she currently lives outside of Boulder, Colorado with her husband of thirty-three years. After attaining a BS in Nursing, Theresa retired to raise four wonderful children and write.
Find Theresa on the web at www.theresarizzo.com, or connect with her on Facebooktwitter or and Goodreads.














What is the first book you read that comes to mind? Why is it so important to you? 


The Black Stallion Series was the first book that came to mind. I’m dyslexic and couldn’t read until the third grade, and even then it was a struggle. The Black Stallion series showed me how worth it the effort was and it opened the magical world of living somewhere else and experiencing something else and I FINALLY got a horse—even if it was just in a book. 

What made you start writing books? 
 
 

I always enjoyed creative writing. But when we had children, I’d write about them and their escapades in my annual Christmas letter and friends and family got such a kick out of my stories, that I thought it was cool I could entertain them that way. But it wasn’t until my fourth baby was born, that I wrote that first book.
Though being a stay-at-home mom is a laudable profession, I felt underappreciated, and living for my kids and husband was sucking the life out of me—all my fault by the way. So I started learning the craft and business of writing, and it saved my sanity. Writing was a wonderful creative intelligent outlet and it fed my soul and made me a much happier person and better mother and wife. 

How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned? 
 

There’s a little of me in all my characters. That’s the great thing about writing I get to express my sexy, evil, mean, mischievous, catty, warm-hearted, brilliant, funny parts of my personality through the various characters, but they all still have their own unique personas too and do and say things I’d never do or say.
There is one heroine in one of the books that writers friends claimed is very much like me—and that was a shock, because I hadn’t intended it at all, and I could see how they would make the comparison. No, I’m not going to tell you who it is. A girl’s gotta have a little mystery J
What author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?

I adore George Clooney and think JK Rowling and Suzanne Collins are brilliant authors.

 

What does your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long you write, or does it happen without planning? 
 

Me plan? Seriously? I’m a former control freak—of course I plan. Okay, so…recovering control freak. Every morning, I get up and skim my email while eating breakfast, then sit down and read what I wrote the day before to get back into the swing of things, then plot out the next scene in this chart I developed to make sure each scene has a strong purpose and accomplishes several things—like advances the plot, shows characterization, sets up something, and ends with a good hook.
Then I break to go to gentle yoga or take my pup on a long walk, eat lunch and then write another few hours. That’s the goal at least.
What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain why! 
 


Historical fiction—hands down. I have HUGE respect for historical writers ‘cause they can’t change the facts of history and harder yet…they’ve got to know all the historical facts and get it right or those readers know. They are savvy readers and seemingly unforgiving of factual mistakes. 

What do you like to do when you are not writing? 

What do you think your profession would be if you were not an author? 
 
 I have a ton of hobbies. I love hiking, playing cards, playing games with my family, reading—of course—traveling, playing tennis, skiing, creating mosaics with my wet tile saw, crocheting and reading some more. If I hadn’t become an author, I probably would have done well in the business world. 

What is the most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan? 

I’ve had a couple of fans tell me they had to stop reading Just Destiny because they were crying so hard the page was blurry and they needed a break. They were emotionally wrung out--in a good way.
 

I was very touched that I was successful in drawing them into the story so that they sympathized with the characters to that degree. I reassured them that there would be a happy ending. 

In your opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have? 
Reading is very, very subjective, but for me…the writing’s got to be good. As an author, pretty picky, but if the writing isn’t good, it’s very unlikely I’ll be drawn into the story or care about the protagonist, and if those two things don’t happen, there’s no point in my reading the story and I’m going to put it down.
What is the most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and after-publication-process)? 

The marketing and being fairly compensated for your work. Writing the book is the easy, fun part, but who wants to write a book and not share it? Not many people. Who wants to work so hard to create a great book and make no money at it? Writing and publishing are not for the faint of heart.

Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different from other authors. The only thing that might make these characteristics different from other authors is that they’re all included in the same book. Most authors will have these characteristics in their books, but perhaps not ALL of them in the same book. 

  • I write very complex plots and characters because life is messy and I like my books to be as realistic as possible—yet will always give the reader a happy ending. 
  • Whatever writing elements I put in my books, I do it to the best of my ability. For instance Silent Sentry has romance, suspense, and mystery, aspects. It also has a lot of factual information with regards to the mafia, Detroit’s decline, the engineering behind Gianna’s invention, Prometheus, etc. Each genre has it’s own conventions and expectations and I worked to master each. I want to make sure I do all of them to the best of my ability. 
  • I write books that draw the reader in and make them feel things. Most readers are vested in my characters and stories.





Thursday, March 10, 2016

Interview with Tiffany Snow during the Release of "Playing to Win"


 TiffanySnow_thumbTiffany attended the University of Missouri – Columbia, attaining two degrees in History and Social Studies Education. After working many years as an instructor and consultant in the Information Technology field, Tiffany now writes full-time. Tiffany loves to read and has been reading romance novels since she was way too young to read such things. She has an unhealthy obsession for all things Doctor Who, prefers Pepsi to Coke and Absolut to both, thinks men who drink girly cocktails are wusses, has learned to never stop believing in her beloved St. Louis Cardinals, and can recite the entire scripts of When Harry Met Sally and Apollo 13. George Washington is cool, Bon Jovi still rocks the house, and Bruce Willis is the ultimate alpha-male hero. Married with two wonderful daughters, Tiffany and her family make their home in Kansas City, Missouri, not far from where she was born and raised in St. Louis, Missouri.
 


  
1) What is the first book you read that comes to mind? Why is it so important to you?  

Nancy Drew, The Hidden Staircase. It was my first “real” book and began my love affair with reading. I devoured the Nancy Drew series and my character Kathleen Turner in the Kathleen Turner Series was an homage to Nancy. 
  
2) What made you start writing books?  

I got really frustrated with Janet Evanovich and Stephanie Plum. I love that series, but grew frustrated as a reader that Stephanie never would choose a man—Morelli or Ranger. So I decided I’d write my own love triangle series of five books and the heroine would choose the right man at the end. So I did.
  
3) In your opinion, what is the most important feature a book needs to have?   

Relatable characters. There has to be something for a reader to be able to understand and relate to in the main character. That creates empathy and attachment and helps the reader enjoy the story more, in my opinion. 
  
4) What author/actor or musician do you ‘fangirl/fanboy’ over?   

I’ve been so very fortunate to have met some lovely authors that I’ve read and admired for years. Eloisa James is a wonderful, gracious lady, as is Lisa Kleypas. I had an unexpected dinner with them at RWA and it was one of the highlights of my life. I’ve also fangirled terribly over Lee Child, with a terrible case of diarrhea of the mouth even as I was telling myself to shut up shut up shut up! But he was gracious as well and tolerated my star struck verboseness.    
  
5) What does your perfect writing day look like? Do you plan when and how long you write, or does it happen without planning?  

I definitely have to plan to write. I have two kids and as all moms know, when you’re at home, there’s a million things that call for your attention. From laundry to groceries, errands to cleaning. So my typical day is up at six-thirty to get lunches ready for school, have my coffee, scroll through email, and get the kids off to school. Then I work from about nine until five or later, though if there’s a deadline looming, chances are good I’ll have my computer on my lap for twelve hours a day, seven days a week. 
  
6) What genre is the most intimidating when you think about writing in it? Explain why!  
  
Definitely urban fantasy or paranormal. It’s one of my favorite genres to read and I can’t imagine having that kind of creativity! I’m in awe of those who can create whole worlds that suck me in. 

7) What do you like to do when you are not writing? What do you think your profession would be if you were not an author?  

I like to spend time with my kids, I love to travel, and reading is always high on my list of guilty pleasures when I should be working. Lol  Before I was an author, I was a network engineer and worked as a system administrator and consultant. 
  
8) What is the most touching reaction you have ever received from a fan?  

I received an email from a fifteen-year-old girl who told me she hated to read because she was dyslexic. She’d decided to start trying to read more to help her in school and read my Kathleen Turner Series inside of a month. Her parents were stunned that she was able to do this and she told me I’d helped her discover a love for reading because of those books. It brought tears to my eyes because reading is truly one of the most amazing pleasures in life and I’m humbled and honored that I was able to help her find some books that spoke to her. 
  
9) How much of you and/or your surroundings is a part of your stories? Is the influence based on a conscious decision, or do you periodically recognize yourself in one of your characters and it wasn’t planned?  

I think there’s a bit of myself in all my characters because otherwise, it’s incredibly hard to find their voice. The most difficult character I’ve ever written was Ivy in the Tangled Ivy Trilogy. She is very different from me, especially in the first book, but even she has shades of Tiffany in her character. I also try to write locations that I’ve spent some time in, just because it’s more authentic and I can convey my love and feel of the place more accurately. 

10) What is the most difficult part of writing a book, (including the preparations and after-publication-process)?  

Finishing. I can start lots of books, but pulling together the plot into a good conclusion and wrapping things up is the hardest part. I especially like to continue my characters stories in multiple books, so saying goodbye to them is hard. I grow attached to my characters. 
  
11) If you had the chance to influence the questions people ask you in interviews, what question is the most annoying and you would love to never hear again? What question would you really like to answer that you have not been asked yet, and what is your answer to that question?  
  
I don’t know if there’s ever an annoying question, though some may get a bit repetitive if I’m doing a lot of interviews. Question I’ve not been asked that I really want to be asked…I’m sorry to cop-out but I don’t think I have any! Lol!  

12) Name three characteristics of your writing style that are important yet different from other authors.   

I adore love triangles. I love playing with more than one hero, usually the anti-hero, and incorporate that a lot in my stories. I think life is usually more complicated than just one love interest, especially if I’m writing a series that takes place over time. People change, events change, and relationships reflect that. 

I also write first-person romantic suspense, which isn’t that common. I used to not even like first-person. The first book I read told in that manner was Twilight. Then I read the Southern Vampire Mysteries (Sookie series) and Stephanie Plum and was hooked. 
  
13) Which of your characters seems to be the most independent, and has taken on a life of their own?  
  
Definitely my most beloved character that fans really enjoyed was Kade Dennon from the Kathleen Turner Series. That series was my first and those characters—Kathleen, Blane, and Kade—are very dear to me. They often appear as “Easter eggs” in my other books, a wink and a smile to readers who’ve been with me since the beginning. 

14) What do you want tell your readers at the end of this interview? 

Thank you for reading and following my series. Romance readers are amazingly loyal and voracious. I hope they like the last book in the Risky Business Series.